INTRODUCTION
Organizations today are faced with a constant challenge of raising and sustaining a committed workforce, a workforce that would see the values and goals of the organization as theirs with a strong sense of belonging and a resolve to remain with the organization. The organization requires such employees who would be able to meet up with their goals and targets. It however, appears that such committed employees are scarce in most organizations today (Ahiazu and Asawo 2009; 2008; and Okpara 2004), may be because most banks have tried to get employees committed through other means that are not giving them the desired result. Rather than forcing employees’ compliance with organizational goals through close supervision, standardization of processes and outcomes, a promise of job security which has failed in most cases, provision of modern office facilities to simplify the work process, and extensive and stringent rules, organizations should rather engage methods that would appeal to and satisfy the social, emotional and psychological needs of employees, which would facilitate voluntary employee involvement and identification with the value and goals of the organizations (Mittai and Mittai, 2005).
One of such methods banks could employ could be to ensure each employee has a balance between his work and personal life demands through the provision and maintenance of a psycho-socially conducive environment that promotes trust, justice and fairness and empathy between the management and employees.
A viable banking sector is essential to the growth and development of a country’s economy. The banking sector in Nigeria has experienced significant increase and growth such that the number of banks have increased from 15 as at 1970 to 120 banks in 1992 (Ihoza, 2007). In the year 2005 the number of Nigerian Commercial banks drastically reduced to 25 banks as a result of .......................................>>>>>

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