Introduction
Job analysis may be viewed as the hub of virtually all human resource management activities necessary for the successful functioning of organizations (Oswald, 2003; Siddique, 2004). At the heart of almost every human resources management program or activity there is need for accurate and thorough job information. Job analysis is thus a prerequisite activity for the effective management of human resources. However, many important assumptions that underlie such fundamental uses of job analysis in management are becoming questionable in today's business environment. Job analysis is focused on the collection of work-related information for the job as it currently exists or has existed in the past (Palmer &Valet, 2001, Schneider & Konz, 1989). Further, the procedures are related more to the situation of a one person-one job situation.


Yet, as competition and technological innovations increase and product life cycles get shorter, jobs are becoming not only less static, but also less individually-based. Consequently, the tasks to be performed, and the Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSAs) required for effective job performance are also becoming more volatile, and sometimes more team-based. Furthermore, and in all likelihood, organizations may perceive the creation of jobs that do not currently exist, the analysis of which is beyond the scope of traditional job analysis.

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